Part 21

Like a rush-hour deluge, love arrived
where it shouldn’t. When we couldn’t.
Stirring up the normal. But love must
be Shakespearean: a costume drama,
poetry frothing at its mouth, selfish,

greedy, visceral. Always wanting more,
wanting so much more that nothing is
enough. Not even love. We’re raised
on happy endings. Even tragedies are
normalized as the best possible result,

given the odds. When love fails, we ask
if it was real. Seek existential assurance.
A real love should have destroyed the
lover when it left. Survival is proof of
what never was. The ledger of longing

is never tallied. The void is carried like
an abscess. Never absent. Never healing.
And yet these are just ordinary wounds.
Not worthy of even an ordinary story.
Do you think a fleeing comet is allowed

to fall in love with the moon? Do you
think the moon should listen to the sky?
Do you think Sisyphus should write a love
song for a nameless paramour who
helped him roll the rock uphill one night?

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34 thoughts on “Part 21

  1. “When love fails, we ask
    if it was real.”

    I’ve always wondered about people’s reaction to relationships that don’t work as expected. If that is true about love, then I guess every single life is a failure. Since we all die… in the end.

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    1. Though life doesn’t ever offer the other possibility of immortality! However, I hear you and your point about taking it on the chin and keeping faith intact, is well made and valid. Thanks, Magaly. You do look at the brighter side, always. It’s a gift.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Very potent questions putting the matters of love to the most grueling of acid tests — “Survival is proof of / what never was. The ledger of longing / is never tallied. The void is carried like / an abscess. Never absent. Never healing. / And yet these are just ordinary wounds. / Not worthy of even an ordinary story.” And yet, despite every negation, love still says Yes, refuting the entire argument with that word.

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  3. As always a wonderful story is told here and much is offered in the way of contemplation. I’d like to think that a blazing comet might have a full blown love affair with the moon as it passes.

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  4. I hope you give this one the read aloud treatment too. It’s so powerful and raw in its expression of pain and rage, not just at the ill-suited ex-lover but at society for the lies it tries to sell us about love.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Oh my God, this poem is exquisite from start to finish, Rajani. It resonates with wisdom throughout. So many wonderful lines, impossible to quote them all. I love the whole analogy that “love must be Shakespearean…poetry frothing at its mouth…”

    And these:

    “We’re raised
    on happy endings. Even tragedies are
    normalized as the best possible result,

    given the odds.”

    “…The ledger of longing

    is never tallied.”

    “Do you think a fleeing comet is allowed

    to fall in love with the moon?”

    So, so beautiful ❤

    Like

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